37 Drought Tolerant Native Vegetation to Develop This Season

Gardening with native plants can be incredibly rewarding. Native wildflowers, ferns, grasses, shrubs, and trees are beautiful, versatile, and easy to grow. You may be surprised how many drought tolerant native plants don’t mind dry soils or a lack of irrigation.

Native plants tend to be low-maintenance and hardy because they are already ideally suited to the local environment. Many wildflowers are easy to start from seed, division, or young plants from a reputable nursery or garden center that stocks native species. Do not dig plants from their natural habitats!

Let’s take a look at 37 fantastic native plants that you can grow this year.

How to Choose the Best Native Plants for Your Garden

Gardening in areas with prolonged or occasional droughts can pose challenges. Rather than relying on regular irrigation to keep your garden watered, choose drought-tolerant plants that will withstand dry soil.

You will probably need a little extra water after transplanting, but once they become established, many drought-tolerant plants will not require extra water at all.

But how do you choose the most ideal plants for your home garden? Here are a few tips for selecting plants that will grow well for you:

  • Learn your USDA plant hardiness zone.
  • Choose plants that are recommended for your local USDA plant hardiness zone.
  • Notice and identify local plants in wild places.
  • Prepare your planting area (including soil amendments) before planting.
  • Choose sun-loving plants for sunny spots, and shade-tolerant plants for shadier areas.
  • Pay attention to a plant’s preferred soil type and prepare your soil to match.
  • Pay attention to a plant’s watering needs and provide ideal moisture levels.
  • Transplant most plants in early spring or fall.
  • Keep the garden area free of weedy competition.
  • Choose the right plants (shape, size, spreading) for your available space.

There are many ways to save water during a drought, including planting native species.

Native Plant Garden Design Tips

Once you have chosen your plants and prepared your garden site, it’s time to design a thriving oasis of native plants. Remember to:

  • Give each new plant plenty of space to grow.
  • Plant lower-growing ground covers in the front of your display.
  • Place taller plants and shrubs towards the back.
  • Group clusters of flowering plants together to attract pollinators.
  • Grow a variety of plants that flower at different times so you can enjoy a colorful landscape throughout the season.

37 Drought-Tolerant Native Plants

These plants are all relatively easy to grow and drought-tolerant. Many can be started from seed or divided from clusters – don’t be afraid to ask gardening friends if they have any plants they are willing to share!

Adam’s Needle

Adam’s needle is a native succulent plant with large, stiff leaves that bloom in mid-summer.

BOTANICAL NAME Yucca filamentosa
PLANT TYPE Broadleaf evergreen
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 4 to 8 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 10

Adam’s needle is a large succulent plant native to the southeastern United States. The evergreen leaves are long and stiff with fine filaments that peel away at the edges of the leaf, like thick strands of thread. Mid-summer, the jumbo-sized flower stalks appear filled with showy, creamy white blossoms. The flowers attract an assortment of butterflies and pollinators.

It is low-maintenance and easy to grow. This plant does best in full sun but will tolerate some dappled afternoon shade. Adam’s needle is not picky about soil quality as long as the soil is well-drained. Plants will spread slowly over time, so give them plenty of space to grow. If they outgrow their allotted space, you can easily divide and propagate them from basal offshoots.

Anise-Scented Goldenrod

Close-up of an Anise-scented Goldenrod flowering plant against a blurred green background. The plant forms clumps or colonies. It has a strong erect stem with branches closer to the top. The leaves of Solidago odora are alternate, lanceolate. They have jagged edges and are arranged along the stem in an alternating pattern. The leaves are dark green and shiny. Solidago odora produces clusters of small yellow flowers at the top of the stems. These flowers are made up of numerous tiny disc florets.Anise-scented goldenrod is a self-seeding perennial with fragrant leaves and bright yellow flowers.

BOTANICAL NAME Solidago odora
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Anise-scented goldenrod, or sweet goldenrod, is an easy-to-grow perennial that starts readily from seed. In ideal conditions, this plant will self-seed and spread, generating a mass of neighboring plants. This goldenrod produces plenty of bright yellow flowers each year in late summer. Contrary to popular belief, goldenrod does not cause hay fever. It simply blooms simultaneously with other plants (like ragweed), which may cause respiratory issues.

Anise-scented goldenrod has sweetly fragrant leaves. The flowers bloom in masses of long, bright yellow clusters, attracting many pollinators, including butterflies. This plant grows best in full sun but will grow well with some partial shade. It is tolerant of many soil conditions but prefers medium-moisture, well-drained soil. If plants become crowded or grow beyond where you want them, you can thin and divide them to keep their population in check.

Beebalm

Monarda fistulosa blooming in a sunny garden. It has square stems, strong and erect, with branches emerging from leaf nodes. The stems are covered with fine hairs and colored purple or reddish-brown. The leaves of Monarda fistulosa are opposite, lanceolate, serrated along the edge, with a slightly fuzzy texture, dark green in color. Monarda fistulosa produces showy flower heads on stems. The flowers are tubular in shape and are collected in dense spherical clusters called Beebalm, a fragrant member of the mint family, is a native wildflower thriving in open grasslands.

BOTANICAL NAME Monarda fistulosa
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 9

Beebalm, also known as wild bergamot, is a fragrant member of the mint family. This native wildflower is widespread throughout North America, where it grows in open grasslands. It likes plenty of direct sunlight. Soil should be of average-to-rich quality and well-drained. Beebalm can be easily grown from seed and can spread via self-seeding and rhizomes.

Beebalm is an excellent choice for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. Its flowers develop as masses of thin pale purple tubular blossoms and bloom from mid-summer until the first frost. If plants grow too densely, they can develop powdery mildew, so thin dense clusters to improve air circulation. Beebalm is not bothered by deer and rabbits.

Big Bluestem

Andropogon gerardii grows in the garden. Andropogon gerardii, commonly known as Big Bluestem, is a tall and robust perennial herb. It has strong erect stems that are reddish in color. The leaves of Andropogon gerardii are long and narrow, bluish green in color and have a rough textured surface. Andropogon gerardii forms pinnate inflorescences at the tops of the stems. Inflorescences consist of dense racemes of small flowers, which are located in branched elongated racemes. Purple or reddish brown flowersBig bluestem is a tall, ornamental native grass that is drought-tolerant, easy to grow, and beneficial for erosion control.

BOTANICAL NAME Andropogon gerardii
PLANT TYPE Ornamental grass
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 4 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Big bluestem is a tall native grass that is quite ornamental. It is found naturally in prairie and grassland regions throughout most central and eastern North America. It is both drought-tolerant and long-standing well into the winter months. If you have a large, sunny, naturalized area and want to add plant diversity, consider some native grasses. Grasses provide excellent erosion control on hillsides or bare areas prone to soil loss.

Big bluestem is easy to grow and to start from seed. It is somewhat slow to establish but will eventually spread by seed and vegetative growth. Flowers bloom in the fall and add some reddish-brown color to this grass. Grow big bluestem in full sun with rich, well-drained soil for best results.

Black-Eyed Susan

Close-up of a blooming Rudbeckia hirta in a garden, against a blurred green background. The plant forms groups of upright stems, with simple, alternate leaves. The leaves are hairy, rough to the touch, lanceolate in shape with serrated edges, dark green in color. Rudbeckia hirta produces stunning daisy-like flowers. Each flower consists of a conspicuous dark brown or black center known as a cone or disc surrounded by bright yellow petals.Black-eyed Susan is a beautiful, drought-tolerant plant that blooms from mid-summer to early fall.

BOTANICAL NAME Rudbeckia hirta
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 2 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 7

Black-eyed Susan is a familiar wildflower. It is a widespread native plant that grows in grasslands and meadows. In the home garden, black-eyed Susan is a wonderful addition to an ornamental landscape. It is beautiful, drought-tolerant, resistant to browsing deer, and easy to grow from seed.

Black-eyed Susan blooms from mid-summer until early fall. If started from seed in the spring, this plant can be grown as an annual or a short-lived perennial.

However, you probably won’t notice that it’s a short-lived perennial because plants readily self-seed, and you will always have new black-eyed Susans popping up. The bright yellow flowers attract birds, butterflies, and other pollinators.

Blazing Star

Close-up of a blooming Liatris spicata plant against a blurred background in a garden. The plant forms upright strong stems. The stems are unbranched and covered with fine hairs. They grow from basal rosettes and are crowned with dense cylindrical peduncles. The leaves of Liatris spicata are long, narrow, herbaceous, dark green in color. They grow in basal tufts at the base of the plant and along the underside of the stems. The flower stalks, high above the foliage, consist of many small, densely packed dark purple inflorescences.Blazing star is a colorful and attractive plant that is a magnet for pollinators.

BOTANICAL NAME Liatris spicata
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Do you have a butterfly garden or a pollinator garden? Try blazing star for a burst of colorful summertime color that’s also a pollinator magnet. Tall spikes of feathery or fluffy-looking purple flowers are the standout feature of the blazing star.

Each plant forms a tall, sturdy stem densely lined with thin leaves. The flower heads form at the terminal end of each stem, blooming from the top down. After blooming, the flower spikes become a dense mass of cattail-like seedheads, which last into the fall and attract seed-eating birds.

Blazing star is readily grown from seed. This plant prefers moist soils, but once established, it tolerates drought. If the stems become too top-heavy while blooming, stake them to maintain an upright position. Blazing star is also sometimes known as gayfeather.

Blue False Indigo

Close-up of a growing Baptisia australis plant in a garden. The plant forms clumps with strong erect stems covered with bluish-green trifoliate leaves. The leaves are smooth and have a slightly leathery texture. Baptisia australis produces tall spikes of pea-like flowers at the tops of the stems. The flowers are a bright shade of blue.The native blue false indigo is a beautiful perennial wildflower that thrives in woodland edges.

BOTANICAL NAME Baptisia australis
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 3 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 9

This beautiful perennial wildflower is native to woodland edges in the central and eastern United States. Plants grown in full sun will be more compact and bushier than those grown in shaded areas.

Ideal growing conditions for the blue false indigo are full sun or dappled afternoon shade, with rich, dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. Blue false indigo develops a long taproot, so mature plants will be difficult to transplant but quite drought-tolerant.

Blue false indigo blooms in late spring. Plants produce spectacular spikes of indigo-blue pea-like flowers. The flowers attract butterflies, and blue false indigo is the host plant for several butterfly species. The flowers and the long-lasting mature seed pods are quite showy and unique.

Butterfly Weed

Close-up of Asclepias tuberosa flowering plant in the garden. The plant forms groups of upright stems. The stems are strong and pubescent, with a reddish or greenish tint. The leaves of Asclepias tuberosa are lanceolate and arranged alternately along the stem. The leaves are bluish-green in color and make an attractive backdrop for the vibrant flowers. Asclepias tuberosa produces clusters of bright orange flowers at the top of the stems. Each flower consists of five petals that form a characteristic star shape.Butterfly weed, a low-maintenance and easy-to-grow plant, serves as a host for monarch butterflies.

BOTANICAL NAME Asclepias tuberosa
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 9

There are many benefits to growing butterfly weed in your garden. Butterfly weed, also known as butterfly milkweed, is one of the host plants for the monarch butterfly caterpillar. The clusters of bright red-orange flowers are pollinator magnets, attracting many species of butterflies and bees. This plant is also low-maintenance and easy to grow in the home garden in the southwestern US and along the east coast.

Grow your butterfly weed in full sun. Give it average-quality, dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. Milkweeds are easy to grow from seed and will self-seed in ideal conditions.

Plants slowly spread over time, forming larger and larger clusters. These plants are not bothered by deer and rabbits; once established, their deep taproots make them drought-tolerant.

Carolina Wild Indigo

Close-up of a flowering plant Baptisia cinerea. The plant forms erect stems covered with greyish-green trifoliate leaves. Each leaf consists of three oval-shaped leaflets with a smooth or slightly hairy texture. Baptisia cinerea produces attractive yellow flowers. The flowers are similar to peas and are collected in oblong brushes at the tops of the stems.Carolina wild indigo thrives in full sun or partial shade with well-drained soil.

BOTANICAL NAME Baptisia cinerea
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 1 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 8 to 9

As its name implies, the Carolina wild indigo is native to a small region extending from Virginia’s coastal plain through North and South Carolina to Georgia. This beautiful plant grows best in full sun or partial shade. Give it well-drained soil where it can establish itself for the long term. Wild indigo develops a long tap root, making it quite difficult to transplant but very drought-tolerant. Start plants from seed.

Carolina wild indigo has the appearance of a tiny shrub with stiff, semi-woody stems. The leaves provide host plant nourishment for a few species of butterfly larvae, and the flowers attract pollinators. Flowers bloom from late spring into early summer. The flowers are bright yellow and pea-like, forming a loose cluster at the end of the flowering stem. After flowering, large dark-colored seed pods provide long-season interest.

Common Dittany

Common Dittany Growing in Field With Purple FlowersThe Common Dittany is a lesser known native plant with beautiful purple flowers.

BOTANICAL NAME Cunila origanoides
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 0.75 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 8

Common dittany may not be the most well-known native plant, but it is worthy of consideration in a native plant garden. Grow it in full sun or partial shade with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. It is easily started from seed and will naturalize quickly in ideal conditions, but its native range is the central and eastern US.

Common dittany has loose clusters of pale lilac-colored flowers that bloom from late summer until early fall. The flowers are small and trumpet-shaped and attract butterflies. The leaves are pleasantly fragrant. Plants that spread and develop into messy clusters can be pruned and thinned to keep them more controlled and tidy.

Common Sunflower

Close-up of a Helianthus annuus flower in a garden, against a blurred green background. The plant is tall and has one strong stem. The stem is covered with coarse hairs and has a green color. The leaves of Helianthus annuus are large, heart-shaped, with a rough texture. They are arranged in alternating order along the stem. The leaves are dark green in color. Helianthus annuus has a large flower head that consists of many small individual flowers surrounded by large yellow petals known as ray florets. The center of the flower head is filled with disc florets forming a dark brown or black central disc.The common sunflower attracts attention and pollinators with its large yellow flowers.

BOTANICAL NAME Helianthus annuus
PLANT TYPE Annual
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 3 to 10 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 2 to 11

The common sunflower is a super showy native annual wildflower. Its large, showy yellow flowers will demand plenty of attention from passersby! It can grow very tall and naturally occurs in grasslands, prairies, and meadows of western North America. Plants are easily grown from seed and will readily self-seed in ideal conditions. Grow common sunflowers in full sun with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil.

Common sunflowers would be a good option for a larger area where you can grow them in a cluster. Use stakes to help support them if they grow very tall and top-heavy. Flowers bloom in mid-summer and attract butterflies and other pollinators. After blooming, when the seeds mature, your sunflowers will become a food source for seed-eating birds!

Dew Flower

Penstemon cobaea, commonly known as cobaea beardtongue, is a beautiful perennial plant native to North America. It is known for its attractive foliage and showy tubular flowers. Penstemon cobaea produces stunning flowers on tall racemes. The flowers are tubular in shape and vary in color, ranging from shades of dark purple to pink or lavender. The flowers are marked with intricate patterns and have contrasting throats that are white.Dew flower is a stunning perennial native to prairies and glades with showy pink or purple trumpet-like flowers.

BOTANICAL NAME Penstemon cobaea
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 2 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 8

This incredibly showy perennial wildflower is native to the prairies and meadowland of the central United States. Dew flower, also called beardtongue, is a low-maintenance plant that thrives in full sun. Give it dry to medium-moisture soil that is well drained, as soggy soils will cause root rot.

Dew flower blooms in the spring and has dazzling flowers. Tall flower spikes sport numerous large trumpet-like pink or purple flowers.

The blossoms attract butterflies, bees, and other pollinators. Plants are not bothered by deer or rabbits. This plant would be an excellent addition to a prairie garden or a standout in your perennial wildflower or pollinator garden.

Downy Phlox

Close-up of a flowering Phlox pilosa plant in a garden. Phlox pilosa is a herbaceous perennial and forms dense thickets. It has slender erect stems covered in fine hairs, giving the plant a slightly downy appearance. The leaves of hairy phlox are lanceolate and arranged oppositely or whorled along the stem. They are green and hairy. The plant forms inflorescences of small fragrant flowers at the tops of the stems. Flowers are pink. Each flower has five petals that form a tubular shape and fuse at the base.Downy phlox is a low-growing perennial wildflower blooming in shades from pink to purple.

BOTANICAL NAME Phlox pilosa
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Downy phlox, or prairie phlox, is a low-growing perennial wildflower. There are many subspecies of this plant, which are native throughout the central and eastern United States.

Downy phlox grows best in full sun with medium-moisture, well-drained soil. It is not bothered by browsing deer and rabbits. Once established, plants become more tolerant of drought.

Downy phlox is an excellent addition to a butterfly, prairie, or rock garden. Plants bloom from late spring through mid-summer. The flowers range from bright pink to pale purple, attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. This plant is easy to grow from seed and will spread over time by underground rhizomes.

Eastern False Aloe

Close-up of a Manfreda virginica plant in the garden. The plant forms a rosette of fleshy succulent leaves. The leaves are long, lanceolate, with serrated edges. They are bluish-green in color, with pale green stripes along the edges.The eastern false aloe is an intriguing addition to rock gardens, featuring long, rigid leaves in a basal rosette form.

BOTANICAL NAME Agave virginica, synonym Manfreda virginica
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 6 to 9

The eastern false aloe, also called American agave, is an intriguing plant for the home gardener. It is native to dry areas of southeastern North America. In the home landscape, grow it in a rock garden or other xeriscape-themed garden setting. Eastern false aloe thrives in full sun with well-drained soil.

Plants form a basal rosette with long, rigid leaves with pointy tips and serrated edges. They flower from mid-summer until early fall. The flowers form on tall spikes that rise several feet taller than the basal leaves. While the flowers are not particularly showy, they add a unique element to the garden. After blooming, the fruit capsules are long-lasting and interesting to look at.

Fragrant Sumac

Close-up of a Rhus aromatic plant against a blurred sky background. Rhus aromatic is a deciduous shrub. The plant has a spreading bushy habit. It forms dense clusters of stems and branches that give it a full appearance. The leaves of fragrant rus are complex and arranged alternately along the branches. Each leaf consists of three oval or lanceolate leaflets with serrated edges. The leaves have a glossy texture. The plant has fluffy, red berries that are a food source for birds and wildlife.Fragrant sumac features small yellow flowers that attract pollinators and produces red fruits for wildlife.

BOTANICAL NAME Rhus aromatica
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to Part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 9

Fragrant sumac should not be confused with poison ivy. This plant is a cousin of poison ivy and bears some visual resemblance but contains no irritating oils. On the contrary, it is an excellent plant for the home landscape. It is easy to grow, beautiful and provides great value for wildlife.

This deciduous shrub blooms in the spring with clusters of small yellowish flowers that attract butterflies and other pollinators. Small red fruits develop in the fall, persisting into winter, and provide a food source for birds and other wildlife.

In the fall, fragrant sumac puts on a spectacular color display as its leaves change from yellow to orange to brilliant shades of red.

Hearts-A-Burstin’

Close-up of the stem of a Euonymus americanus plant with berries, against a blurred green background. Euonymus americanus is a deciduous shrub. The plant has opposite leaves, elliptical or ovoid in shape. The leaves are dark green and have a glossy texture. A distinctive feature of the plant are the fruits of the American euonymus. These are round berry-shaped capsules resembling strawberries. The fruits ripen from green to pinkish red, eventually opening to reveal bright orange-red seeds.Hearts-a-burstin’ is a scraggly-looking deciduous shrub with small white flowers and vibrant red fruits that attract birds.

BOTANICAL NAME Euonymus americanus
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Part shade
HEIGHT 4 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 6 to 9

Hearts-a-burstin’, also known as the American strawberry bush, is an unusual plant to add to your drought-tolerant native plant garden. This deciduous shrub is somewhat scraggly-looking, forming several sparsely-leaved, upright, green stems.

Small white flowers bloom in the spring but are not particularly showy. The primary interest in growing this plant is the bright red fruits that burst out of deep pink capsules. The fruits and capsules are attractive and long-lasting on the stems. The small red fruits are also favorites among birds.

Deer love to eat the leaves of this plant, so if you live in an area with deer, you will need to protect your hearts-a-burstin’ with a fence or plant something else entirely. These plants will spread over time and look nice when planted in a naturalized woodland area. They prefer dry to moist soil and tolerate occasional drought.

Indian Blanket

Top view, close-up of a blooming Gaillardia pulchella plant. The plant has deeply lobed, lanceolate leaves that are pubescent and grey-green in color. The leaves are arranged in a basal rosette at the base of the plant, with additional leaves growing along the stems. Gaillardia pulchella produces stunning daisy-like flowers. The flowers have a prominent central disc surrounded by ray-shaped inflorescences. The disk is dark red, while the marginal inflorescences vary in color from bright yellow to orange or red.Indian Blanket boasts showy red and orange flowers that attract butterflies and pollinators.

BOTANICAL NAME Gaillardia pulchella
PLANT TYPE Annual
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 2 to 11

Indian blanket is a familiar flower, widely available in garden centers and easily grown from seed. It is typically grown as an annual, although in warmer climates, it can be treated as a short-lived perennial. Plants will readily reseed themselves and will naturalize in large undisturbed areas.

This annual native Gaillardia grows throughout eastern and south-central North America. Gaillardia cultivars are available commercially, and some are more hardy perennials.

Indian blanket blooms during the summer and continues until the first frost. The flowers are red and orange, very showy, and quite prolific. While blooming, they attract butterflies and an assortment of pollinators. After flowering, the seedheads attract seed-eating birds. Indian blanket is best grown in a location with full sun and well-drained soil.

Largeflower Aster

Close-up of blooming Symphyotrichum grandiflorum in a garden, against a blurred green background. Symphyotrichum grandiflorum, commonly known as large-flowered aster or western aster, is a perennial wildflower. The plant has lanceolate leaves, dark green and slightly hairy. Symphyotrichum grandiflorum produces profuse clusters of daisy-like flowers at the ends of the stems. The flowers are lavender-violet-blue. Each flower consists of numerous ray inflorescences surrounding the yellow center.Largeflower aster features deep purple flowers with yellow centers that attract late-season butterflies.

BOTANICAL NAME Symphyotrichum grandiflorum
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

The largeflower aster (also called the big-headed aster) is native to Virginia and the Carolinas but can be grown in a much wider region. Plant it in full sun with average-quality, well-drained soil. Largeflower aster is a low-maintenance plant that grows easily from seed. Over time, plants will spread and look particularly stunning en masse during full bloom.

The largeflower aster is a fairly small plant that looks insignificant during most of the growing season. Small leaves grow along somewhat stiff woody stems.

When many other plants have finished flowering in late fall, this one bursts into bloom with numerous 1-inch-wide, deep purple flowers with yellow centers. The flowers attract late-season butterflies.

Large-Flowered Tickseed

Close-up of flowers of Coreopsis grandiflora, commonly known as large-flowered tickseed, in a sunny garden. The plant has a compact appearance, forming lumps. It has bright green leaves that are lanceolate and deeply lobed or divided. The leaves are arranged alternately along the stems. Coreopsis grandiflora produces bright, daisy-like flowers. The flowers have bright yellow petals surrounding a prominent dark yellow centre.Large-flowered tickseed produces bright yellow flowers that bloom throughout the summer.

BOTANICAL NAME Coreopsis grandiflora
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1.5 to 2.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Large-flowered tickseed is a beautiful wildflower native to much of North America. The bright yellow flowers bloom throughout the summer and attract butterflies and bees.

Plants form clusters of upright stems with thin leaves that remain deep green throughout the growing season. These plants are low-maintenance and easy to grow from seed. They will spread and naturalize but can be easily controlled by removing unwanted seedlings.

Grow your large-flowered tickseed in full sun. They do well with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. Excess moisture can be a problem for these plants. Wet soil will cause root rot, and overly crowded plants in humid environments are susceptible to powdery mildew. Plants tolerate drought and are not bothered by deer or rabbits.

Mapleleaf Viburnum

Close-up of a young Viburnum acerifolium plant in a sunny garden. Viburnum acerifolium is a deciduous shrub. It has opposite leaves with deep lobes, reminiscent of maple leaves. The leaves are medium green in color and have a soft velvety texture. Viburnum acerifolium produces clusters of small, pinkish, rounded buds that will soon open into creamy white flowers.Mapleleaf viburnum is a shade-tolerant, drought-tolerant shrub with attractive flowers, foliage, and fruits.

BOTANICAL NAME Viburnum acerifolium
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 3 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

The mapleleaf viburnum is a deciduous shrub that doesn’t mind shade. This plant is native to eastern North America, typically growing as an understory shrub in open woodlands and moist forests. Once established, mapleleaf viburnum is drought-tolerant. It is a welcome addition to the home landscape, providing an attractive form with flowers and leaves throughout the growing season.

Clusters of white flowers bloom in early summer, attracting butterflies. After flowering, prune your plants, as needed, to maintain the desired size and shape. In the fall, the maple-leaf-shaped foliage turns brilliant shades of pinkish-orange. If two different viburnums are grown nearby, they can cross-pollinate and set fruits in the fall. The dark purple, berry-like fruits will attract birds.

Maryland Goldenaster

Close-up of a flowering Chrysopsis mariana plant in a garden. It has narrow lanceolate leaves, green and pubescent. The leaves are arranged alternately along the stems and have serrated edges. Chrysopsis mariana produces clusters of daisy-like flowers at the ends of the stems. The flowers have bright yellow petals that surround a prominent yellow center.Maryland golden aster thrives in full sun with well-drained soil and is drought-tolerant.

BOTANICAL NAME Chrysopsis mariana
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 1 to 2.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Maryland goldenaster is native to the southeastern United States. It is best grown in full sun with gritty, well-drained soil. Established plants are drought-tolerant.

Maryland goldenaster is a short-lived perennial that is easily grown from seed. The plants will die back after a couple of years but will continue to reseed themselves and will naturalize in larger areas with ideal growing conditions.

Maryland goldenaster grows low basal rosettes. From these, several upright leafy stems emerge. From late summer until mid-fall, bright yellow flowers bloom. Each plant can produce many showy flowers, displaying an attractive autumn burst of color. The flowers also attract late-season pollinators.

Nodding Onion

Close-up of flowering Allium cernuum plants in a sunny garden. Allium cernuum is a perennial herbaceous plant. The plant has a slender upright habit. It has linear, grass-like leaves that grow in tufts at the base of the plant. The leaves are green and have a smooth texture. Allium cernuum produces unique hanging flowers that hang in clusters from the tops of thin stems. The flowers are small, bell-shaped, with six pale pink or purplish pink petals.Nodding onion blooms delicate pink flowers in summer, attracting butterflies and bees.

BOTANICAL NAME Allium cernuum
PLANT TYPE Bulb
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 1 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

This delicate-looking wild onion has beautiful, nodding pink flower heads.  Nodding onion blooms in the summer and typically sends up one flower stalk per bulb.

Plants will slowly multiply by self-seeding and bulb division, creating small clusters of onion plants. When crushed, the long, thin leaves have a slight onion smell and are not bothered by browsing herbivores.

Nodding onions can be grown as part of an herb garden, rock garden, pollinator garden, or wildflower garden. These plants need low-moisture, well-drained soil, as the bulbs will rot if grown in wet soil. Nodding onion prefers full sun but will tolerate some partial afternoon shade, especially in warmer climates. Flowers attract butterflies and bees.

Pale Purple Coneflower

Close-up of an Echinacea pallida flower on a blurred green background. Echinacea pallida has a daisy-like flower with pale purple petals and a cone-shaped center. The petals are thin and hang down, creating an elegant and delicate look. The cone-shaped maroon center is surrounded by long thin bracts.Pale purple coneflower, a native perennial, thrives in dry grasslands, adding beauty to your garden.

BOTANICAL NAME Echinacea pallida
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 10

Pale purple coneflower is an attractive perennial wildflower native to dry grasslands of central and eastern North America. This plant is a welcome addition to a prairie garden, sunny naturalized area, or butterfly and bird garden. Grow it in full sun with average-quality, well-drained soil.

The pale purple coneflower blooms in mid-summer. Tall flowering stems appear well above the lower foliage. A single flower forms at the end of each tall stem.

The flowers are large and showy with prominent central disks and long, downward-slanting, pale purple petals. The flowers are very attractive to butterflies, and seed-eating birds will feast on the seeds later in the season. You can prune or deadhead for more bloom production.

Pink Muhly Grass

Close-up of a flowering plant Muhlenbergia capillaris. It is a perennial ornamental grass. The plant has a habit of gathering in lumps. It has thin, curved leaves that are narrow and grass-like. The leaves are green in color and have a fine, delicate texture. Muhlenbergia capillaris produces attractive flower plumes that rise above the foliage. The plumes are feathery and appear in a soft pink or reddish hue.Pink muhly grass is a beautiful native grass that forms dense clusters of thin leaves.

BOTANICAL NAME Muhlenbergia capillaries
PLANT TYPE Ornamental grass
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

Pink muhly grass is a beautiful native grass. It grows in dense clusters of thin, fine leaves. From mid-to-late fall, a fine haze of delicate pink grassy flowers blooms across the top of each plant, creating the image of a fine pink mist.

Plants grown in full sun will have much better blooms than those grown in shaded areas. The pink blossoms fade to brown but remain standing on the plant throughout the winter months.

Pink muhly grass is easy to grow in full sun and average, well-drained soil. Once established, it is very drought-tolerant and withstands less-than-ideal growing conditions. New plants may occasionally sprout from seed, and larger clusters can be divided if desired. A large group of pink muhly grass plants in full bloom makes an eye-catching sight in the landscape!

Eastern Prickly Pear Cactus

Close-up of many flowering Opuntia humifusa plants. Opuntia humifusa, commonly known as eastern prickly pear or low prickly pear, is a perennial cactus. It is known for its characteristic paddle-shaped stems, thorns, and showy yellow flowers. The plant forms low spreading clusters. Its stems, known as cladodes, are flattened and fleshy, resembling thick, rounded pads. Cladodes are green in color and covered with small, sharp spines. Opuntia humifusa produces bright yellow flowers. The flowers are large, with numerous petals and a bright yellow color.The native Eastern prickly pear cactus has sharp spines, sprawls on fleshy pads, and can be easily propagated.

BOTANICAL NAME Opuntia humifusa
PLANT TYPE Cactus
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 0.5 to 1 foot
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

The Eastern prickly pear cactus is one of the few cactuses native to the eastern and central United States. This easy-to-grow plant offers some unique vegetation to the landscape, but be cautious around this plant; its spines are long and very sharp! Round, flattened clusters of tiny spines are also very painful to the touch. Grow your prickly pear cactus in full sun with dry, well-drained soil.

Prickly pears develop numerous large, fleshy pads that tend to sprawl more than stand upright. If a healthy pad falls off, it can be propagated by simply touching the lower end to the soil surface, where it will root and grow a new cactus plant!

In mid-summer, prickly pear blooms with large, showy yellow flowers. Plants are not bothered by herbivores, and the flowers attract pollinators. The leaves stay evergreen throughout the winter.

Purple Coneflower

Close-up of Echinacea purpurea flowering plants in a sunny garden. Echinacea purpurea, commonly known as purple coneflower, is a perennial herbaceous plant native to North America. The plant has upright growth. It has lanceolate leaves that are dark green in color with a rough texture. The leaves are arranged in an alternating pattern along the stems and have serrated edges. Echinacea purpurea produces attractive flowers with bright purple petals and a distinctive cone-shaped centre. The petals are arranged around the center in a radiant pattern, giving the appearance of a daisy.Native to central and eastern North America, purple coneflower thrives in sunny locations with well-drained soil.

BOTANICAL NAME Echinacea purpurea
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

This native wildflower is found in prairies and grasslands throughout central and eastern North America. Grow purple coneflower in your home landscape in any sunny location with well-drained soil. Deer may nibble small, tender, young plants, but they are no longer bothered as the plants become larger and tougher.

Purple coneflower blooms throughout the summer. The flowers are large and very showy. They have prominent central disks that look like a sizeable reddish-orange pincushion, surrounded by bright pinkish-purple petals. Butterflies and other pollinators love the flowers, and after blooming, seed-eating birds (especially the American Goldfinch!) will hungrily forage on the seed heads.

Purple Poppy Mallow

Top view, close-up of a flowering plant Callirhoe involucrata in a sunny garden. Callirhoe involucrata, commonly known as winecup or purple poppy mallow, is a low-growing perennial wildflower native to North America. The plant forms a spreading mound with deeply lobed, palmate leaves that are green in color and velvety in texture. The flowers are cup-shaped with five purple petals and a white central eye.Purple poppy mallow displays stunning deep pink flowers in late spring or early summer.

BOTANICAL NAME Callirhoe involucrata
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 0.5 to 1 foot
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

Purple poppy mallow is a beautiful wildflower native to the central United States. Its deep pink flowers are very showy and bloom in late spring or early summer.

Purple poppy mallow is easy to grow from seed and will self-seed and naturalize in ideal conditions. An established patch of purple poppy mallow makes an effective ground cover. When in bloom, it provides an eye-catching display.

Grow purple poppy mallow in a rock garden, native plant garden, or as a low-growing border plant. It thrives in full sun and will become leggy with fewer flowers if grown in a shaded area. Plants are not picky about soil type as long as the location is well-drained. They will tolerate shallow or rocky soil, as well as drought conditions.

Rattlesnake Master

Close-up of an Eryngium yuccifolium plant on a blurred green background. The plant has a habit of forming clumps. Differs in long xiphoid leaves, rigid, sharp and bluish-green color. Eryngium yuccifolium produces round, globular flower heads that sit on tall sturdy stems. The flower heads consist of many small, densely spaced buds that range in color from white to pale green. The bracts surrounding the flowers are spiked and give the flower heads their distinctive appearance.The rattlesnake master forms a basal rosette with long, yucca-like leaves and blooms unique, spiky flowers.

BOTANICAL NAME Eryngium yuccifolium
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 4 to 5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Rattlesnake master is an unusual plant found naturally occurring in tallgrass prairies of the central and eastern United States. Ideal conditions for this plant include full sun and dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. Plants develop a long taproot and are difficult to transplant but can be easily started from seed. Once established, they are very resilient to drought conditions.

Rattlesnake master develops a basal rosette of long, thin, yucca-like leaves. Flowers bloom from mid-summer through early fall. The flowers are showy and unique, looking more like spiky orbs than a traditional flower form. Regardless of their unique appearance, they are quite showy and attract butterflies and many other pollinators.

Rose Verbena

Close-up of flowering plants Glandularia canadensis against a blurred background of a sunny garden. Glandularia canadensis, commonly known as rose vervain or Canadian vervain, is a perennial wildflower. The plant has a spreading habit, characterized by basal leaves with deep lobes, divided into several narrow segments. Glandularia canadensis produces compact inflorescences of small tubular flowers on slender stems. The flowers have five petals and are pink to lavender in color.Rose verbena is a versatile ground cover for butterfly gardens, containers, and borders.

BOTANICAL NAME Glandularia canadensis
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 0.5 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

Rose verbena makes an excellent ground cover for a butterfly garden, rock garden, or along borders and edges. This plant is also a great choice for containers and hanging baskets. This low-maintenance plant has showy rounded clusters of pinkish-purple flowers. The flowers bloom throughout the summer months and attract butterflies.

Rose verbena, also known as rose mock vervain, is native throughout the central and eastern United States. This plant is easily grown from seed and will self-seed in ideal conditions.

Grow it in a location with full sun and dry to medium-moisture soil. Soil can be average quality or rocky but must be well-drained. While it can be very drought-tolerant, you’ll see more vibrant shows of color if it’s given occasional watering!

Shrubby Evening Primrose

Close-up of a flowering plant Calylophus serrulatus covered with dew drops, in a sunny garden. The plant has a lumpy growth habit. It has green lanceolate leaves with serrated or serrated edges. The leaves are arranged alternately along the stems. Calylophus serrulatus produces showy, cup-shaped flowers in a bright yellow hue. The flowers have four petals.Shrubby evening primrose is a native plant of western North America, featuring bright yellow flowers.

BOTANICAL NAME Calylophus serrulatus
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 0.5 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

The shrubby evening primrose, also called the plains evening primrose, is native to western North America and grows across the great plains in dry prairie habitats. Once established, it is well-adapted to drought conditions. Grow this primrose in a location with full sun and very well-drained soil.

The showy, bright yellow flowers of shrubby evening primrose bloom in mid-summer. Some varieties of evening primrose display open flowers only in the evenings, but the shrubby evening primrose flowers remain open throughout the day. The leaves are narrow and toothed, adding a bit of diversity to your drought-tolerant garden plot.

Shrubby St. John’s Wort

Close-up of a flowering Hypericum prolificum plant against a bright green background. Hypericum prolificum, commonly known as shrubby St. John's wort or shrubby hypericum, is a deciduous shrub native to eastern North America. The shrub has a dense bushy habit. It has elliptical or lanceolate leaves arranged oppositely. The leaves are dark green in color and have a slightly leathery texture. Hypericum prolificum produces clusters of bright yellow flowers with five petals. The flowers are star-shaped and have a conspicuous cluster of prominent yellow stamens in the center.Shrubby St. John’s wort is a native, medium-sized shrub that produces bright yellow flowers that attract pollinators.

BOTANICAL NAME Hypericum prolificum
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 1 to 5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Shrubby St. John’s wort is a medium-sized shrub native to eastern North America. It grows best in full sun but will tolerate partial shade. Be sure to give your shrub plenty of space because plants grown in full sun will flower better than those grown in more shaded locations. Shrubs generally grow in a rounded shape and make excellent hedges or borders.

Prune shrubby St. John’s wort in early spring. Flowers develop on new growth, so you must prune annually for the best flowering. The bright yellow flowers are very showy and attract butterflies and other pollinators. The seed pods are also attractive for late-season interest. While this plant prefers moist soil, it will tolerate occasional drought once established.

Spiderwort

Tradescantia ohiensis, commonly known as Ohio spiderwort or bluejacket, is a perennial wildflower native to North America. The plant has upright growth. It has long narrow leaves of a linear or lanceolate shape, resembling grass, green. Tradescantia ohiensis produces clusters of three-petalled flowers on thin stems. The flowers are a rich purple color.Spiderwort prefers full sun and produces deep purple flowers that attract butterflies.

BOTANICAL NAME Tradescantia ohiensis
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Spiderwort may be a familiar roadside plant. It is native to eastern North America and grows in prairies, woodland edges, and grassy meadows. It is best grown in full sun. Plant it in a location with average-quality, dry to medium moisture, well-drained soil. In ideal conditions, spiderwort will spread by seed and offshoots and form large clumps.

Spiderwort blooms in late spring or early summer. The deep purple flowers are showy and attract butterflies and other pollinators. After flowering, the vegetation may look a bit messy and ragged. This plant would do well in a larger naturalized area. Spiderwort appreciates regular soil moisture but is also tolerant of occasional drought.

Southern Sundrops

Close-up of Oenothera fruticosa against a blurred green background. Oenothera fruticosa, commonly known as sundrops or narrowleaf evening primrose, is a perennial flowering plant. The plant has an upright, lumpy appearance. It has green lanceolate leaves with a slightly hairy texture. Oenothera fruticosa produces showy, cup-shaped flowers in a bright yellow hue. The flowers have four petals and usually open in the evening.Southern sundrops, a drought-tolerant native wildflower, thrives in full sun and well-drained soil.

BOTANICAL NAME Oenothera fruticosa
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1.5 to 2.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Southern sundrops, also known as narrow-leaf evening primrose, is a beautiful plant for your native wildflower garden. It is best grown in full sun with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. This drought-tolerant wildflower is native to eastern North America and easy to grow throughout the region.

Southern sundrops blooms from mid-summer until early fall. The bright yellow flowers are showy and cheerful. Although many members of the primrose family bloom only at night, the sundrops flowers stay open throughout the daytime.

Each flower is short-lived, but each plant will produce many flowers quickly for a long-lasting bloom season. Plants are easily grown from seed and will readily self-seed in the garden.

Stiff Aster

Top view, close-up of the flowers of the Ionactis linariifolia plant in the garden. Ionactis linariifolia produces small, daisy-like flowers with pale lilac petals surrounding a yellow and red center.The native stiff aster is a low-maintenance plant with pale purple flowers and a bright yellow center.

BOTANICAL NAME Ionactis linariifolia
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 2 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

The stiff aster is a welcome addition to a native plant garden. Native to eastern North America, stiff aster is easy to grow and low-maintenance. As a fairly low-growing plant, the stiff aster can be easily incorporated into a sunny rock garden or used along borders and garden edges. Give it a location with full sun and gritty, well-drained soil.

Leaves are thin and somewhat stiff, growing off a semi-woody stem. Unlike many asters that bloom late in the season, stiff aster blooms mid-summer.

The flowers are showy, with pale purple petals surrounding a bright yellow center. The flowers are not profuse but add some mid-season color and attract butterflies and other pollinators.

Switchgrass

Close-up of a flowering perennial ornamental grass Panicum virgatum. The plant has an upright, lumpy appearance. It features long, slender leaves that are green and have a slightly rough texture. The leaves have a distinctive midrib and are arranged alternately along the stems. Panicum virgatum produces airy, open panicles of flowers on branched stems. Flowers are reddish in color.Switchgrass, a tall native grass, thrives in full sun and medium-moisture soil.

BOTANICAL NAME Panicum virgatum
PLANT TYPE Ornamental grass
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 3 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

Switchgrass, also sometimes called panic grass, is a tall ornamental native grass that grows wild throughout North America. In the home landscape, it does best in full sun with medium-moisture soil. Once established, however, it tolerates dry soil and occasional droughts.

Switchgrass can grow into wide clumping bunches of stems up to 6 feet tall. This grass flowers in mid-summer, with seed heads lasting well into the winter. Native grasses can help control erosion and are useful for larger naturalized areas. This variety can be a bit too large for a smaller garden area.

Threadleaf Coreopsis

Close-up of flowering plants Coreopsis verticillata, commonly known as threadleaf coreopsis, is a perennial wildflower native to North America. The plant has an upright bushy appearance. It has finely textured, thread-like green leaves arranged in whorls around the stems. The leaves give the plant a feathery appearance. Coreopsis verticillata forms clusters of small yellow flowers with a protruding central disc. The flowers are similar to daisies with several petals surrounding a disk.Threadleaf coreopsis is a low-maintenance plant that blooms with bright yellow flowers throughout the summer.

BOTANICAL NAME Coreopsis verticillata
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 2.5 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 9

Threadleaf coreopsis is easy to grow and low maintenance. This plant grows readily from seed and will reseed itself in ideal conditions. Any unwanted or sprawling growth can be controlled by hand-pulling. Self-seeding can be minimized by deadheading spent flowers. Grow your threadleaf coreopsis in full sun with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil.

The threadleaf coreopsis has a relatively long blooming period. You will see the bright yellow flowers anytime throughout the summer months. The showy flowers attract butterflies and plenty of other pollinators. The plants are not bothered by browsing deer and rabbits. Plants are also tolerant of drought and poor soil conditions.

Woodland Sunflower

Close-up of Helianthus divaricatus flowering plant in a sunny garden. Helianthus divaricatus, commonly known as woodland sunflower, is a perennial wildflower native to North America. It features lance-shaped leaves that are green and have a slightly rough texture. The leaves are arranged alternately along the stems. Helianthus divaricatus produces clusters of yellow, daisy-like flowers with a dark orange center. The flowers have multiple petals radiating from a central disk, creating a sunflower-like appearance.Woodland sunflower produces masses of bright yellow flowers from mid-summer to fall.

BOTANICAL NAME Helianthus divaricatus
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Woodland sunflower, sometimes called rough sunflower, can be found in grasslands and open woodlands throughout eastern North America. This plant is best grown in partial shade with well-drained soil. It is not picky about soil quality and, once established, doesn’t mind drought. This plant is also not bothered by browsing deer.

The woodland sunflower is a beautiful native wildflower. Masses of bright yellow flowers bloom from mid-summer into fall. Each plant produces several flowers on short stems.

They make excellent cut flowers and also attract butterflies. Later in the season, birds come to feed on the seeds. This would make an ideal plant to grow in a large mass along a woodland border. If plants become top-heavy and flop over, stake them to maintain an upright position.

Final Thoughts

When looking for drought-tolerant plants that are easy to grow, there are plenty of native species to choose from. Gardening in drought conditions can be a challenge, but native plants are a great choice for challenging conditions because they are naturally well-adapted to the local and regional environmental ranges.

When choosing plants for your garden, select the species that are accustomed to your specific growing conditions:

  • Choose sun-loving plants for a garden patch in full sun.
  • Choose shade-tolerant plants for your shade garden or for growing in partially-shaded areas near trees, fences, and buildings.
  • Prepare your site before planting to create the ideal soil conditions for your garden plot.

Give your plants some extra attention and care until they are well-established, and then you can enjoy your garden to its full extent!

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